You’re Lucky to Be Alive: How to Not Waste the Gift

“Don’t pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one.” – Bruce Lee

Life’s hard. The higher you aim the harder it will become, and I don’t think that this should be seen as a complaint or even something we ought to want to change.

Life is hard, we must work harder.

Turn on the news for a second – and I know this is done on purpose, to horrify, to keep people scared, in fear, and opposed to one another, and probably to make us addicted in some way too – and you’ll see that life is filled with events that are not fair, they’re horrible, there’s turmoil, pain, anguish, and uncertainty.

I have faith, which helps. I have it because, to me, it makes sense, it wasn’t pushed upon me, I want it. Even with faith, with this knowledge that there’s a higher power, that I’m not completely random, man, the questions we as humans have to face, why are we here, what’s our purpose, what’s the point, they’re profound, they can be paralyzing if you forget that we’re damn lucky to be here at all.

Heck, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), every year in the world there are an estimated 40-50 million abortions. This corresponds to approximately 125,000 abortions per day.

According to UNICEF about 29,000 children under the age of five – 21 each minute – die every day, mainly from preventable causes.

To make it to whatever age you are right now, is a massive stroke of fortune or luck, a blessing, a gift.

Life is hard, yet it’s incredibly fortunate to have it at all.

This isn’t counting those brave souls who die far too young protecting us and our freedoms.

This isn’t counting a lot, actually. The point is that while life is hard, and that’s something we must accept, it’s also something so fragile, so beautiful, so rare, that we must live it.

It cannot be waited on, wasted, or wished for.

Life, in its truest sense, demands movement and action.

Life is hard, sure, it’s hard for everyone, harder for some, of course, but to live means you actually have to make it harder on yourself, not easier.

Those who live, waste no time being idle. They don’t wait for breaks or wish for improvements or spend time comparing their lives to those that others are living. They move, fast, forward, constantly bettering themselves because the only way you’re going to better the world is by becoming better yourself.

You, I, none of us live remaining as we are. We get better tomorrow, and then again the next day, by reading, experimenting, working, tirelessly working.

The higher you aim, the harder life will be. The more risks you’ll have to take, the more work you’ll have to do, but the greater the rewards will be both in the end and in who you become.

Never settle. Never stop moving. Never stop working.

Work, work, work.

Want to be more disciplined? Get a FREE copy of my new audiobook The Lost Art of Discipline HERE

Nothing worth anything doesn’t demand constant work, be it a business, a relationship, a family, they all demand work, and that’s life.

Life is work. It is not ease.

The other day I was hunting near the Albertan Rocky Mountains.

The deer were few and far between and those we saw sensed us far sooner. They were gone before we had a chance.

As we hopped in the truck to heard out after a long day of hiking and glassing, we spotted a couple massive wolf tracks, and then some more.

The wolves are out hunting the elk, the elk are elusive as elusive can be. Nature is constant turmoil. Constant struggle. It never ends. The hunter tries to kill and if he doesn’t he dies and the hunted tries to evade, and if they don’t, they die.

Humans are no different.

We all want success and improvement, and that success and improvement isn’t relegated to work, it encompasses everything. We want victory in every aspect of our lives, and to get it we have to work at it – whatever it is – every day of our lives.

Appreciate the gift of life that you nor I have done a single thing to deserve, and try everyday to earn it by moving forward, moving faster, getting after it.

Be Legendary,

Chad Howse