How to Increase Testosterone in Men (Start Sleeping Better)

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Quickly, I’m still working on the full nutrition article that’ll help you create your Man Diet Approved meal plan to cut fat, increase testosterone in men, and gain muscle, so I should have that for you by tomorrow.

Today, sleep.

Why is sleep important?

Every extra hour of sleep you get up until 8 hours helps you see a jump in testosterone of about 15%.

Think about that…

Your T levels will increase by 60% if you get 8 hours of sleep vs 4 hours of sleep.

Why?

Cortisol.

Cortisol – along with estrogen – is one of the biggest obstacles you face in trying to create optimal testosterone levels. Sleep helps you dramatically lower your cortisol levels.

On top of that, we produce the vast majority of our testosterone levels when we sleep (primarily in REM sleep, or ‘deep sleep’).

So how do you get more REM sleep?

Well, I’m the perfect guy to write this email because for YEARS I suffered from insomnia. I’ve visited dozens of sleep doctors, tried nearly everything, and over the years I’ve created routines, habits, even diets that have helped me get great sleeps.

So, here’s what I’ve come up with thus far that has helped me sleep from years of research but also a ton of trial and error.

How to Get an EPIC Sleep (Routine)

1. Coffee in the morning.

Coffee is awesome, it helps with energy levels, clarity, and focus. It tastes great. 2 cups before a workout helps increase testosterone levels during said workout. It also increases cortisol levels, which isn’t bad while we work, and that helps us lower our cortisol levels later in the evening.

When your body works to lower your cortisol levels, it increases melatonin, which helps us sleep.

2. Morning workout.

A few studies have shown that training in the morning helps you sleep. So, I’ve been training in the morning for a while now, and it helps.

Compared to not-exercising at all, working out will help you sleep no matter when you do it, but the effect of a workout in the morning is greater than afternoon or evening.

3. Your last meal.

I consume a hefty amount of carbs in my last meal – which occurs at round 5 or 6. Carbs help lower cortisol levels, which helps us relax, be calm, and get sleepy. It isn’t immediate, but a few hours after that last meal I’m fading.

4. Supplements.

I take ZMA (zinc, magnesium) an hour before bed, along with ashwagandha.

I’ve noticed big improvements in sleep quality with VIKING (ashwagandha – get it on sale here).

It lowers cortisol by 27%, which is a lot. That final cortisol reduction really helps with sleep quantity and quantity, which is one of the main reasons why I created VIKING. I’m a fan of ashwagandha, and with VIKING we give you an overdose (which is good).

5. Brain dump/reflection.

At the end of every work day I reflect on the work done, set up the next day, write something I’m grateful for, and close the book on that work day.

If I don’t do this, my mind races, I don’t reflect on the day so I’m continually thinking about what I should’ve done or have to do tomorrow. This is vital.

6. Laugh

Every evening (mostly every evening) I’ll throw on an episode of the Office or Seinfeld or Curb Your Enthusiasm, and laugh.

I love to laugh. I need it. Does it help me sleep? I think so. Watching the news has the opposite effect, and actually so does reading a good book.

At night, when we’re tired, we’re irrational. The logical part of our brain doesn’t work the same. So thinking about deep, important topics isn’t advised.

Laughing, again, lowers cortisol, which helps you relax, produce more melatonin, and sleep better.

Give that little list a shot.

The sleep QUALITY is important. Not just the quantity, so lowering your cortisol levels at night is vital.

Definitely add these things to your routine as you can, and pick up a bottle or two of VIKING.