I remember watching the Passion of the Christ in theatres with a pal. We went not knowing what to expect, just that it’s something we should watch. A couple hours after it started two goofballs usually cracking jokes walked out in silence. We didn’t chat at all. I dropped my pal off at home and drove home myself, continuing in silence. We were both awestruck, which is rare today.

Visiting the site of the Passion (the suffering and sacrifice) obviously had a similar effect, but greater. I didn’t speak, moving from site to site, from where He was crucified to where He was laid to rest, I felt weight, awe, appreciation. Some were crying, others snapping pics like any tourist spot.

We know He lived. We know He died (the Romans bat 1.000 at killing people, they don’t botch crucifixions).

We know we rose (500+ unorganized sightings post death, many of whom themselves were put to death for spreading that story – something not to be taken lightly).

I don’t push my faith whatsoever. It’s not about that. It’s in part about how we live – something He did powerfully, more powerfully than any, most of which happened within a 3 year period and I’m still falling short having lived a year longer than He did. It’s also about why we live.

What we’re here for. Is there a soul, a spirit, or does our energy collapse along with our bodies? Religions are used by people to divide, to earn money, to influence improperly. They also feed and clothe, unite and – as in this case – leave many humbled and appreciative and ready to live better, love better, and serve better. The more questions I find answers to, the more I have to ask.

The more I know I know, the less I know.

We spend our lives in avoidance of deeper issues. We watch tv and scour our phones for entertainment. We connect less the more we are connected. In places like this you’re forced to be where you are, appreciate what you have and what has been done for you. You’re forced to go deeper than the surface. No matter what you believe, it’s important to do just that.

To disconnect to connect. To feel and think at the same time. To appreciate. To truly be in awe.

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